• Best Review

    Best (George Best: All By Himself)

    Though arguably too linear in scope, the latest chronicle of our greatest footballing talent's tragic journey is nonetheless elegantly and fearlessly told

  • La La Land

    La La Land

    Despite its artistic virtues, the limp narrative of Damien Chazelle's modern musical just won't leave audiences as jazzed as they were with Whiplash

  • Silence

    Silence

    Liam Neeson is the white whale of Scorsese's monumental 26-year passion project, which caps a career-long study of spirituality on the big screen

  • Two Angry Men

    Two Angry Men

    Toto Ellis leaves us longing for a feature length in his debut short outlining the theatrical censorship his father and Sam Thompson faced in Belfast 60 years ago

  • Hubert Butler

    Hubert Butler: Witness to the Future

    Writer, humanitarian and market gardener, 'Ireland's Orwell' is given due recognition for his years-ahead endeavors in this detailed documentary

  • Killer of Sheep

    Killer of Sheep

    With its truthful depiction of racial issues in 1970s America, Charles Burnett's long-lost indie trailblazer is the perfect primer for BFI Black Star

  • 400 Blows Main

    The 400 Blows

    François Truffaut’s pioneering French New Wave classic signals an encouraging start to a season of films to see before you're 30

  • Vintage Cinema Bus

    Vintage Cinema Club

    Michael McAlinden takes a bus back to film's golden age for a special showing of John Ford's The Quiet Man

  • The Revenant

    The Revenant

    Leonardo DiCaprio and the makers of Birdman combine for the visceral, awe-inspiring culmination of their cinematic careers

  • Pan

    Pan

    Despite an occasionally turgid narrative, Neverland's potential to thrill remains undeniable in Cinemagic's film festival opener

  • Best Review

    Best (George Best: All By Himself)

    Though arguably too linear in scope, the latest chronicle of our greatest footballing talent's tragic journey is nonetheless elegantly and fearlessly told

  • The Fits

    The Fits

    This adolescent dance drama eschews coming-of-age tropes in favour of a more unorthodox yet fascinating slow burn

  • La La Land

    La La Land

    Despite its artistic virtues, the limp narrative of Damien Chazelle's modern musical just won't leave audiences as jazzed as they were with Whiplash

  • Silence

    Silence

    Liam Neeson is the white whale of Scorsese's monumental 26-year passion project, which caps a career-long study of spirituality on the big screen

  • Two Angry Men

    Two Angry Men

    Toto Ellis leaves us longing for a feature length in his debut short outlining the theatrical censorship his father and Sam Thompson faced in Belfast 60 years ago

  • Hubert Butler

    Hubert Butler: Witness to the Future

    Writer, humanitarian and market gardener, 'Ireland's Orwell' is given due recognition for his years-ahead endeavors in this detailed documentary

  • Killer of Sheep

    Killer of Sheep

    With its truthful depiction of racial issues in 1970s America, Charles Burnett's long-lost indie trailblazer is the perfect primer for BFI Black Star

  • Anthropoid

    Anthropoid

    Jamie Dornan and Cillian Murphy excel as Czech army agents in a tense and compelling account of one of the Second World War's less heralded moments

  • 400 Blows Main

    The 400 Blows

    François Truffaut’s pioneering French New Wave classic signals an encouraging start to a season of films to see before you're 30

  • Vintage Cinema Bus

    Vintage Cinema Club

    Michael McAlinden takes a bus back to film's golden age for a special showing of John Ford's The Quiet Man

  • The Revenant

    The Revenant

    Leonardo DiCaprio and the makers of Birdman combine for the visceral, awe-inspiring culmination of their cinematic careers

  • Pan

    Pan

    Despite an occasionally turgid narrative, Neverland's potential to thrill remains undeniable in Cinemagic's film festival opener

  • Miss Julie Main

    Miss Julie

    Fermanagh's Castle Coole stands tall in Colin Farrell's simmering Victorian drama, despite the stage-to-film adaptation's big screen shortcomings

  • 13 Minutes

    13 Minutes

    David Holmes reunites with Oliver Hirschbiegel as the Downfall director returns to familiar ground, albeit with more mixed results

  • Shooting for Socrates Review

    Shooting for Socrates

    We may not be Brazil, but with its see-through 'period setting' and wafer-thin plot James Erskine's chronicle of Northern Ireland's 1986 World Cup fails to even suspend disbelief

  • Timbuktu

    Timbuktu

    As far removed from the mainstream as its setting, Abderrahmane Sissako’s unflinching picture is rich in its portrayal of totalitarian rule in Africa but not without its glimmers of hope

  • I Am Here, David Holmes

    I Am Here

    David Holmes' directorial debut is a personal, poetic film born of bereavement following the death of his brother – watch the full film now

  • Rosewater film

    Rosewater

    Satirist Jon Stewart's directorial debut tells the remarkable story of one journalist's interrogation at the hands of the Iranian government after appearing on The Daily Show

  • The Survivalist

    The Survivalist

    Stephen Fingleton’s tense, hypnotic and masterful debut, shot in and around Ballymoney, is a mesmerising dystopian tale

  • Kurt Cobain

    Cobain: Montage of Heck

    Brett Morgen's artful documentary uses home movie footage and Kurt Cobain's extensive journals to reveal the man behind the music

  • Robot Overlords

    Robot Overlords

    Carrickfergus and Donaghadee provide the backdrop for this bland sci-fi that could yet find an audience as an inadvertent cult comedy

  • Cinderella

    Cinderella

    Director Kenneth Branagh's straight adaptation of the familiar fairy tale is a witty visual spectacle that will charm well beyond the stroke of midnight

  • Run All Night

    Run All Night

    Liam Neeson's latest action flick is an unexpectedly engaging take on the Irish-American mafia narrative in which he cements his position as this generation's Charles Bronson

  • Boogaloo and Graham

    Boogaloo and Graham

    Michael Lennox's BAFTA-winning, Oscar-nominated short took on the world and won the hearts and minds of millions – read our review ahead of two screenings at Queen's Film Theatre

  • Still Alice

    Still Alice

    When her mother was diagnosed with vascular dementia and Parkinson's disease, our critic's life was turned upside down – she reviews the low-budget, Oscar-winning film that reflects her real world experience

  • It Follows

    It Follows

    Fright fans, remember the name – David Robert Mitchell channels his inner John Carpenter in a gripping feature stalked by an unseen, unknown spectre

  • Birdman

    Birdman

    Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu's satire on life for the 21st century artist is a complex, concentrated work that just might earn Michael Keaton a first Academy Award for Best Actor

  • Selma

    Selma

    Northern Ireland's own Bloody Sunday is foreshadowed in Ava DuVernay’s civil rights drama featuring an Oscar-worthy central performance by British actor David Oyelowo as Martin Luther King, Jr

  • Inherent Vice

    Inherent Vice

    Queen's Film Theatre screen Paul Thomas Anderson's trippy noir starring Joaquin Phoenix

  • A Most Violent Year

    A Most Violent Year

    Passed up in every major category at the Academy Awards, JC Chandor's period drama is a powerful, complex picture

  • Whiplash

    Whiplash

    JK Simmons is the drum tutor from Hell in Damien Chazelle's scorching jazz opus

  • Taken 3

    Taken 3

    Liam Neeson runs out of steam in Olivier Megaton's excruciating pay off to a high-earning trilogy

  • Testament of Youth

    Testament of Youth

    Vera Brittain's war memoir makes for an intense cinematic experience

  • The Theory of Everything

    The Theory of Everything

    Eddie Redmayne becomes scientist Stephen Hawking in revealing biopic

  • The Hobbit

    Peter Jackson's unrecognisable The Battle of the Five Armies is a triumph of style over substance

  • Murray Christmas

    Xmas Movies

    Ralph McLean reviews his top ten festive favourites to make the season of goodwill go a little bit faster

  • Black Sea

    Michael Smiley joins an ensemble crew searching for Nazi gold in Kevin MacDonald's tense thriller

  • St. Vincent

    Bill Murray is an unlikely babysitter in Theodore Melfi's quirky comedy also starring Chris O'Dowd

  • The Drop

    James Gandolfini's final film is a gripping ensemble adaptation of the gritty Dennis Lehane novel 

  • The Imitation Game

    The Imitation Game

    Benedict Cumberbatch is extraordinary in Morten Tyldum's flawed biopic of Enigma breaker Alan Turing

  • I Am Ali

    Claire Lewins uses exclusive audio journals to tell at least part of the legendary boxer's life story

  • The Fall

    With episode two of series two set to air tonight, we look back at the slow-burning opener

  • Third Person

    Liam Neeson is an author struggling with a failing narrative in Paul Haggis' similarly unsuccessful ensemble piece

  • Serena

    Jennifer Lawrence and Bradley Cooper make it three for three in Susanne Bier's long-in-the-making English language debut

  • '71

    Jack O'Connell excels in this taut Troubles-era thriller by director Yann Demange and writer Gregory Burke

  • Dracula Untold

    Northern Ireland provides a dramatic backdrop to Gary Shore's largely superficial blockbuster 

  • A Most Wanted Man

    Philip Seymour Hoffman is every inch the jaded spook in his final film directed by Anton Corbijn

  • A Walk Among the Tombstones

    Liam Neeson stars in this stylish, lean adaptation of the Lawrence Block novel

  • In Order of Disappearance

    Hans Petter Moland channels the Coens in this comic revenge thriller shot on the Norwegian tundra

  • The Hundred-Foot Journey

    Lasse Hallström's adaptation is aesthetically pleasing but stuffed full of unpalatable clichés

  • Second Chance Cinema

    Cinephile cooperative screen three Northern Irish films for free at the South Bank Playhouse

  • Two Days, One Night

    Two Days, One Night

    Marion Cotillard gives an unmissable performance in the Dardennes brothers' portrait of life on the edge

  • Jeremy Thomas

    The heavyweight British film producer discusses a career behind the camera at Queen's Film Theatre

  • The Congress

    Actress Robin Wright sells a version of herself in Ari Folman's dystopian allegory on paternalist Hollywood

  • Lilting

    Ben Whishaw stars in Hong Khaou's touching English language debut about sexuality and acceptance

  • Joe

    Nicholas Cage finds critical salvation in David Gordon Green's latest feature set in the rusted, dilapidated South

  • Mood Indigo

    Michel Gondry's whimsical adaptation of the Boris Vian novel is a cocked-eyebrow of a film that never lets up

  • Grand Central

    France is smitten with nuclear energy, but not the workers, in this adaptation of Elisabeth Filhol's satirical novel

  • The Hundred-Year Old Man...

    ... Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared lives up to its protracted title

  • Cold in July

    1980s Texas is the backdrop to Jim Mickle's impressively pulpy adaptation of the Joe R Lansdale novel

Pages