• The Dead Beside Us

    The Dead Beside Us

    Tony Doherty wastes no time in following up his 'important' debut with a 'profound' adolescent account of conflict continuing to tear through 1970s Derry

  • Ulster Scots James and Philip

    This is Hame: Two Modern Ulster-Scots Poets

    James Fenton and Philip Robinson have been recently re-published by Ullans Press. Their books offer a window into that world – its language, humour, culture, religion and politics

  • Hopdance Review

    Hopdance

    Against a pre-Troubles Belfast, Stewart Parker's posthumous novel shows one of the city's favourite sons discovering what would become a seminal writing voice

  • Rule of the Land Garrett Carr

    The Rule of the Land

    With eloquence and tact, Garrett Carr charts a timely expedition along the line that divides and defines Ireland, its history and its people

  • Heaney Young

    Heaney, Sir! St Columb's Remembered

    One-time peers including Phil Coulter recall the poet's college years with revealing anecdotes, recitals and an audience panel

  • Sinead Moriarty.jpg

    The Way We Were

    Dublin author Sinéad Moriarty gives shelter to fiction fans in Bangor with an intimate discussion around her latest novel and writing career

  • Ulster Hall 1890

    The Musical Life of Nineteenth-Century Belfast

    Roy Johnston's posthumous chronicle of the formative period is an unprecedented work. Claire Savage reports from its launch at the Linen Hall Library

  • James Ellis Troubles Over the Bridge

    Troubles Over the Bridge

    James Ellis's memoir raises questions of the times that deprived the late actor of his true off-stage potential as well as the wider barriers art must often overcome

  • Ian Rankin 1

    An Evening with Ian Rankin

    The acclaimed author on why his latest release isn't 'really a Rebus novel', as the retired detective moves out on his own in the Scottish capital

  • Connolly McGilloway

    Brian McGilloway and John Connolly

    Two of Ireland's most accomplished crime authors trade literary lessons to mark the double launch of their latest books

  • The Rest Just Follows

    Glenn Patterson's nostalgic new novel recalls the strangely free and quiet Belfast of the 1970s

  • Willy Vlautin

    Glenn Patterson talks with the American novelist and songwriter about Obama Care and The Free

  • Edna O'Brien

    The famous fiery red head novelist speaks of her memoir 'Country Girl' and the outcry caused by the epochal ‘The Country Girls’

  • Parallax

    An 'intensely visual, evocative' collection from TS Eliot Prize winner Sinéad Morrissey

  • Alternative Ulsters

    Mark Carruthers asks Seamus Heaney, James Nesbitt and others what Ulster means to them

  • Celebrate the City

    Three of Belfast's finest writers pay tribute to the legacy of CS Lewis

  • The Polaris Whisper

    Kenneth Gregory's debut fantasy novel leaves John Higgins desperate for the next two volumes

  • Longbourn

    Jo Baker imagines what life was like for the servants in Pride and Prejudice

  • Divine Comedy

    Padraig Coyle follows the path of Dante's Divine Comedy into Marble Arch Caves and to White Island

  • The Poet and the Piper

    Seamus Heaney and Liam O'Flynn revisit their 2003 album at the Fleadh Cheoil na hÉireann

  • Town and Country New Irish Short Stories

    Maureen Boyle bemoans the lack of northern writers

  • Jay Rayner

    The restaurant critic holds court in Belfast's Crescent Arts Centre. His style is not to Fionola Meredith's taste

  • Grounded

    Sheena Wilkinson's award-winning novel is 'devastating and beautifully written'

  • Jon Ronson

    The acclaimed author and 'chronicler of the human condition' waxes lyrical in Derry~Londonderry

  • TransAtlantic

    Colm McCann's epic new novel spans generations, focusing on historic crossings between Ireland the USA

  • One City One Book

    Composer Philip Hammond struggles to relate as Glenn Patterson spins vinyl from the Good Vibrations soundtrack

  • Will Self

    Absurdist jokes, ruminations on rambling and 'dizzying, synaesthetic' descriptions of London are the order of the day

  • Kerry Hardie

    County Down poet confronts death and embraces nature in a prose and poetry reading at the Crescent Arts Centre

  • The Lifeboat Readings

    Leontia Flynn and Sophie Collins continue a series of free readings on the Belfast Barge

  • Humdinger!

    Quercus Ensemble and Roddy Doyle perform at the inaugural children's book festival in Derry~Londonderry

  • Free Derry Protest and Resistance

    Adrian Kerr's history of protest and resistance in the maiden city 'is a valuable addition to the Troubles canon'

  • Plath – A 50 Year Retrospective

    Academics commemorate the life and work of prolific writer and poet Sylvia Plath

  • The Loughsiders

    Shan Bullock's 1924 novel is republished by Turnpike Books, but is Bullock really 'the Thomas Hardy of Fermanagh'?

  • A Twisted Root

    Patricia Craig delves into her mixed Irish ancestry to discover Republican activists and the founder of the Orange Order

  • Tom Paulin

    Initially hesitant, the once 'notoriously combative' critic, essayist and poet eventually finds his voice on a return visit to Belfast

  • Scroobius Pip

    The Poetry Chicks' Abby Oliveira supports the London-based poet and hip hop artist at Out To Lunch. 'Think Hemingway in a hoodie'

  • Changing Times

    Peter Smyth fails to confront the political inequalities that characterised our wee country during the 1950s

  • Stewart Parker A Life

    Marilynn Richtarik's definitive biography pays tribute to the 'greatest playwright the city of Belfast has ever produced'

  • Ciaran Carson

    The multilingual poet, author and musician describes surviving a stray bullet as 'happenstance' and muses on aislings, Asimov and other worlds

  • Belfast The Emerging City

    15 academics explain the city's rise to industrial prominence, but author Glenn Patterson's contribution wins out

  • A Verse to Murder

    Belfast's salacious literary scene provides the backdrop for Tony Bailie's latest crime story, which is short, sharp and sleazy

  • A Sudden Sun

    A 'poignant and powerful' examination of bereavement in a changing Derry City by author Dave Duggan

  • Be My Enemy

    The second instalment in Ian McDonald's Infundibulum series for young adults is a riveting ride through time and space

  • Kicking the Black Mamba

    Robert Welch's moving account of his alcoholic son's death 'should be on every school curriculum'

  • From Farquhar to Field Day

    Nuala McCallister Hart recalls three centuries of music and theatre in Derry~Londonderry

  • Belfast Taxi

    A cast of colourful characters feature in Lee Henry's 'brilliantly researched root and branch history of taxiing in Belfast'

  • Happy Days

    Enniskillen is 'enriched, educated and entertained by the spirit and the words' of Samuel Beckett

  • The Decline of the Irish Murder

    Author and performer Reggie Chamberlain-King on crime and punishment in fiction and song

  • Orion

    Rosie Johnston's story of Orion the hunter is 'an epic poem in the classical tradition', writes Louise Richardson

  • Disappeared

    Crime author Gayle Curtis is shocked and informed by Anthony Quinn's journey into the dark heart of the Troubles

  • On My Own Two Wheels

    Diagnosed with diabetes at 60, Malachi O'Doherty returned to cycling. His thoughts on the subject are inspiring

  • Writing in Light

    The luminaries of Irish literature photographed in their homes by Darragh Casey. Cup of tea, anyone?

  • Selected Poems by Gerald Dawe

    Belfast poet Gerald Dawe's seven collections distilled into one, with 'home territory' the dominant theme

  • Maritime Trail

    A literary jaunt through decaying Sailortown as part of the 'Poets and Players, Dockers and Dreamers' series

  • So It Is

    A Scot's take on Northern Ireland's troubled past shows early promise, but 'feels like a wasted opportunity'

  • The Light of Amsterdam

    David Park chronicles our shared journey toward a post-Troubles future 

  • Glenn Patterson at CQAF

    The quintessential Belfast writer brings 'humour, precision and delicacy' to Polish Cultural Week

  • Shadowstory

    Jennifer Johnston brings her latest novel to life and talks how it is a 'sort of disappearing book'

  • The Fall

    Violent gangs, murderous bankers and a clever, twisty narrative herald the arrival of Claire McGowan, a new voice in crime

  • Ahab's Daughter

    Lisa Keogh's deftly written, emotionally fluent account of what happened to Captain Ahab's family after Moby-Dick

  • Planesrunner

    Quantum widgets and tarot-reading pilots: a ‘fantabulosa bona’ start to Ian McDonald's Everness series

  • Sound It Out

    A documentary about our love affair with independent record stores is 'heartbreaking and always engaging'

  • Streets

    The Wireless Mystery Theatre brings urban folklore and children's rhyme together on the very literary Streets

  • Jon Ronson

    The author and film-maker on George Clooney, Ian Paisley and psychopaths in the room

  • Lionel Shriver

    The author of We Need to Talk About Kevin on why she considers herself a 'Belfast writer'

  • Eagle's Wings

    'A unique and definitive history' of Ulster-Scots, Scotch-Irish and Presbyterians in Northern Ireland

  • By the Banks of the Lagan

    Ben Simon's collection of oral histories of the Lagan conjures up rural idylls and model asylums

  • The Aspects Debate

    Whether it's apathy across the water or sighs down south, the authors at Aspects agree things are only getting worse  

  • Colin Bateman's Crime Night

    The Scottish crime writer hints Rebus may have another story to be told

  • Nick Laird and Blake Morrison

    Two different writers, two different styles, one common theme - mothers and fathers.  

Pages