The Seattle Sound in Derry

Fighting With Wire and Mojo Fury find nirvana in NI


Fighting With Wire

Machine Parts

OK, so these tracks have been knocking about for a while now, but the knock-out punch of the ‘Machine Parts’ single is the perfect introduction to the delights of Derry’s finest, Fighting With Wire.

The title track captures FWW in their rawest, most pure state, the precise distillation of what this unruly trio of punk-rock upstarts are all about. Factory precision drums and crunching guitar converging to construct the perfect backdrop to Cahir Doherty's imploring vocal. The lyric is an angsty, embittered epistle to a failed love.

Unfortunately, ‘Contemplating Someone Else’ fails to grab with the same neck-throttling intensity. It is a competent track, but at times FWW - like their Schism stable mates Mojo Fury - make their Nirvana fixation all too obvious. ‘Tonight Matthew, I’m going to be Kurt Cobain’.

Doherty's vocal is an uncanny approximation of the Seattle scene godhead. He earns partial redemption with his consummate guitar work, with some inspired hooks preventing this track from descending into the realms of grunge pastiche.

Mojo Fury
Mojo Fury EP
(Schism)

Unbridled guitar, brute drum and coarse, snarling vocals, this 3-track from Mojo Fury is a volatile concoction. Two and three minute bursts of galvanizing punk-rock, the sound is lean and sinewy. Propelled by driving rhythms, opener ‘The Man’ creates an atmosphere that flits between emboldened defiance and nerve-jangling, twitchy paranoia.

‘Pretend We’re Not Robots’ is an intensely cathartic session of rock 'n' roll therapy. The plaintive tenderness and ache in the verse providing delicate counterpoint to the vexation evident in the chorus. However, good as these first two tracks are, it is ‘Shootin For A Livin’ that really grabs the attention.

The opening chords are captivatingly sleazy - think the Stooges or MC5 at their lowlife best. However an astute lyric ensures this is more than a mere gutter-rock jaunt.

Like the myriad other sons-of-Nirvana, (The Vines and more recently, Nine Black Alps), what Mojo Fury have achieved here is not hugely innovative. But perhaps that’s asking too much at this early stage. On the basis of this 3-track it is clear that Mojo Fury have the talent and temerity to progress their sound into something distinctly their own.

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